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The 5th World Congress on
Controversies in Neurology (CONy) - Asia Pacific
Life Course Related Conditions
Beijing, China, October 13-16, 2011
 
  Sunday, October 16 Print
         
HALL A
         
08:00-10:00
Chinese Half-Day Session
Chairperson:
Wei Wei Zhang, China
 
08:00-08:40
 
  
 
08:40-09:30
 
 
09:30-10:00
Universality and individuality of stating
Ping Ye, China
Zingquan, China
  
Small vessel disease and nimodipine: Past, present and future
Yan Sheng Li, China
  
Secondary prevention of ischemic stroke
Yongjun Wang, China
   
10:00-10:15
Coffee Break
  
10:15-11:50
Chinese Half-Day Session continued ...
10:15-10:45
 
 
10:45-11:15
 
 
11:15-11:40
 
11:40-11:50
Time point of using brain protection agency
Xiao Kun Qi, China
 
Chondriosome protection and CNS disease
Wei Wei Zhang, China
 
Case Report
 
Q&A
 
 11:50-12:00
Technical Break   
    
12:00-13:00
LIFE COURSE RELATED CONDITIONS
 
 
12:00-12:25
 
 
12:25-12:50
  
 
12:50-13:00
Topic in controversy: Disability in major conditions in Neurology
 
Public health of health policy
J. Beard, Switzerland
 
Comparison with the clinical approach to geriatric care
J. Gindin, Israel
 
Discussion
         
HALL B :: REHABILITATION
         
Rehabilitation Section Heads Volker Homberg, Germany & Dafin Muresanu, Romania
     
Session (25) 
NEUROREHABILITATION
08:30-10:30 
 
Capsule:
Currently, pharmacological modulation stands as one of the most promising assets in supporting neurorecovery.  We should also keep in mind that many molecules frequently used in the treatment of various disorders are double blade swords, influencing negatively neuroplasticity also.  Rehabilitation robotics represents an interactive class of clinical devices designed to evaluate patients and also deliver therapy.
These debates will evaluate to what extent and in which circumstances they might have clinical added value and how we should judge the human interaction
Chairpersons: 
Tong Zhang, China; Wei Wei Zhang, China
 
08:30-09:30 
Debate: How drugs influence neurorehabilitation?
Yes: Dafin Muresanu, Romania
No: Volker Homberg, Germany
Commentator: Klaus von Wild, Germany
        
09:30-10:30  
Debate: Is robot supporting therapy of high added value in neurorehabilitation?
Yes: Hermano Igo Krebs, USA
No: Nava Blumen, Israel
Commentator: Heinrich Binder, Austria
   
10:30-11:00 
Coffee Break  
 
Session (26) TRAUMATIC BRAIN INJURY
11:00-13:00
Capsule: Traumatic brain injury (TBI) is a leading cause of death and disability.  Early intervention by multidisciplinary rehabilitation specialists is indispensable for maximal functional recovery.  At the same time, pharmaceological support of neurorehabilitation is becoming a valid therapeutical asset, particularly in the context of the multimodal drugs approach.  Post traumatic seizures frequently occur after moderate and severe TBI.  Although some data suggested that prophylactic treatment may be useful in preventing early seizures, there are many arguments against
Chairpersons: 
Yiling Cai, China; Klaus von Wild, Geramny; Pieter Vos, The Netherlands
  
11:00-12:00
Debate: Care and drugs: Which best improves outcome after TBI?
Drugs: Dafin Muresanu, Romania 
Care & rehabilitation: Leopold Saltuari, Austria
Commentator: Volker Homberg, Germany
    
12:00-13:00
Debate: Early seizures after TBI: To treat or not to treat?
Yes: Pieter Vos, The Netherlands
No: Alla Guekht, Russia
Commentator: Jean-Luc Truelle, France
          
HALL C :: PAIN / NEURODEGENERATIVE DISEASES
       
Session (27) 
PAIN
Chairpersons:
Tony Ho, USA; Mira Kapisyzi, Albania
 
Capsule: The goals of interventional pain management are to relieve, reduce, or manage pain and improve a patient's overall quality of life through minimally invasive techniques specifically designed to diagnose and treat painful conditions. Interventional pain procedures target well defined anatomic structures, important in either the generation or the transmission of pain. Interventional pain management also strives to help patients return to their everyday activities quickly and without heavy reliance on medications
08:30-09:30 
Debate:  What is the role of invasive procedures in pain medicine
In the early stage / Only in a later stage / Commentator:
Silviu Brill, Israel
Hans L. Hamburger, The Netherlands
        
Capsule: The potent antinociceptive and antihyperalgesic effects of cannabinoid agonists in animal models of acute and chronic pain provide support that cannabinoids exhibit significant potential as analgesics. Cannabinoids have been evaluated in clinical studies for their suppression of acute, postoperative and neuropathic pain. Based upon reviews of the literature, cannabinoids exhibit their greatest efficacy when employed for the management of neuropathic pain.
In making a decision regarding whether to use a cannabinoid, one may apply the same guidelines for chronic neuropatic pain, including screening for past and current risks for addiction
09:30-10:30  
Debate: Medical cannabis for the pain patient?
Pro / Con / Commentator:
Silviu Brill, Israel
Christian Lampl, Austria
       
10:30-11:00 
Coffee Break  
 
Session (28) SEVERE DYSPHAGIA IN NEUROMUSCULAR DISEASES
11:00-13:00 
Chairpersons:
Dongsheng Fan, China; Daniel Truong, USA
 
Capsule: Dysphagia is not uncommon in neuromuscular disorders and sometimes may be the presenting symptom and many patients will require mechanical dysphagia-alleviating interventions, such as esophageal dilation (ED), botulinum toxin injection, or cricopharyngeal myotomy (CPM).  These procedures are neither devoid of complications nor are their benefits permanent.  Because they improve only the cricopharyngeal segement of swallowing, they may be useless when tongue activity, pharyngeal propulsion or esophageal function is affected.  Therefore, careful patient selection and appropriate timing is mandatory.  In many cases, the natural history of these diseases allows for a very narrow window of time; when they are most required they might be already useless          
11:00-11:30
Debate: The best treatment for severe dysphagia in neuromuscular disease is: 
Surgical/mechanical intervention: Itzhak Braverman, Israel 
Conservative followed by PEG: Sergiu C. Blumen, Israel   
   
Capsule:
Jacob "Jack" Kevorkian (1928-2011), an American pathologist, son of an Armenian genocide survivor, was an ideologue and fervent supporter of euthanasia for terminally ill people. Between 1991 and 1998 he assisted or performed 130 "mercy killings".
Kevorkian's crusade for physician assisted suicide (P-AS) has ignited a highly polarized public debate
11:30-12:00
Debate: Is Dr. Jack Kevorkian's influence on treating incurable neurological diseases positive?
Yes: Sergiu C. Blumen, Israel 
No: Jeffery Schwartz, USA
      
12:100-13:00
Debate: Western Pacific ALS-Parkinsonism-dementia complex: genetic or toxic etiology?
Genetic: John Steele, USA
Genotoxic: Peter Spencer, USA 
Commentator: Lea Grinberg, USA
 
  
         
     
Hall A
POSTER AWARDS AND CLOSING CEREMONY
13:00-13:30
 
Chairpersons: 
Wei Wei Zhang, China ; Amos D. Korczyn, Israel; Torbjorn Tomson, Sweden
 
 

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